Welcome to the Baldivis

 
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About Our Club

Baldivis

We meet In Person
Mondays
Peel Manor House
164 Fletcher Road
Karnup, WA 6176
Australia
Phone:
0438 885 495
7:00PM every second Monday
6 SEASONS IN YEAR

Makuru -
Cold and wet time of the year (fertility season) June - July

Makaru sees the coldest and wettest time of the year come into full swing. Traditionally, this was a good time of the year to move back inland from the coast as the winds turned to the west and south bringing the cold weather, rains and occasionally snow on the peaks of the Stirling and Porongurup Ranges.

As the waterways and catchments started to fill, people were able to move about their country with ease and thus their food sources changed from sea, estuarine and lake foods to those of the lands in particular the grazing animals such as the kangaroo. As well as a food source, animals provided people with many other things. For example, 'Yongar' or kangaroos not only provided meat but also 'bookas' (animal skin cloaks that were used as the nights became much cooler). Nothing was left; even the bones and sinews were used in the manufacturing of bookas and for hunting tools such as spears.

Makuru is also a time for a lot of animals to be pairing up in preparation for breeding in the coming season. If you look carefully, you might now see pairs of 'Wardongs' (ravens) flying together. You also notice these pairs not making the usual 'ark ark arrrrrk' that these birds are well known for when flying solo. Upon the lakes and rivers of the South West, you'll also start to see a large influx of the Black Swan or 'Mali' as they too prepare to nest and breed.

Flowers that will start to emerge include the blues and purples of the Blueberry Lilly (Dianella revoluta) and the Purple Flags (Patersonia occidentalis). As the season comes to a close, you should also start to notice the white flowers of the weeping peppermint (Agonis flexuosa) as the blues start to make way for the white and cream flowers of Djilba.

 

 

The Nyoongar calendar has six seasons, each representing the changes we see in the environment.

 
More accurate and a better description of what actually happens.
Locally there are 6 seasons starting December and about 2 months each.  
 
BIRAK
BUNURU
DJERAN
MAKURU
DJILBA
KAMBARANG
 
You can also see what happens in other parts of the country as well.
Taken from ABC facebook page :)
 
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Sergeant-at-Arms
November 2020
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Upcoming Events
Speakers
Brett Wormall
Nov 30, 2020 7:00 PM
Baldivis Community Gardens
Birthdays & Anniversaries
Member Birthdays:
  • Dean Klesser
    November 17
  • Brett Wormall
    November 19
  • Katherine Paul
    November 24
Anniversaries:
  • Bob Phipps
    Kay Phipps
    November 6
  • Kay Phipps
    Kay Phipps
    November 6
Join Date:
  • Lukarla McCready-Turner
    November 27, 2017
    3 years
Peters Projection Map
This map shows a corrected land mass size
 
Unlike the more common Mercator map Check the sizes of Africa and Greenland. This may distort thinking on relative size of the worlds problems.
 
Rotary Videos to watch
Have a look at the videos of what we are part of in the world
 
8000 kilometres
 
Rodeo Academy
 
RSS
In a time of social upheaval, where should America go?

Chicago Rotarian Xavier Ramey says the key to creating an equitable society is understanding where we’ve been

Rotarians pledge to restore the monarch butterfly’s disappearing habitat

Seventy-five percent of the world’s plant species are dependent on pollinators, such as the monarch, to survive

History: A Home for Headquarters

The idea that Rotary should own its headquarters dates back at least to the 1920 convention, when RI President Albert Adams said that he hoped to someday see the headquarters in a beautiful building of Rotary’s own.

Hunger hits home: The pandemic reminds us that food insecurity isn’t just ‘over there’

Hunger and malnutrition unleashed by COVID-19 could carry the impact of the pandemic far into the future.

Club News
AFRICAN REGION CERTIFIED WILD POLIO-FREE
Dear Rotarians,

It our pleasure to announce to you that the African region has just been certified wild poliovirus-free.

Rotary members have played an invaluable role in the effort to rid the African region of wild polio. We should be proud of all the hard work that we’ve done to eliminate the wild poliovirus throughout Africa and in nearly every country in the world. 

This progress is the result of a decades-long effort across the 47 countries of the African region. It has involved millions of health workers traveling by foot, boat, bike and bus, innovative strategies to vaccinate children amid conflict and insecurity, and a huge disease surveillance network to test cases of paralysis and check sewage for the virus. 

Over the last two decades, countless Rotary members in countries across the African region and around the world have worked together to raise funds, immunize children, advocate with local and national leaders, and raise awareness about the importance of vaccination, enabling the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) to effectively respond to and stop polio outbreaks. 

This milestone is an incredible public health achievement for Rotary members, the African region, and our GPEI partners, and a huge step forward on the road to global polio eradication. But we still have important work to do in order to eradicate wild polio in the last two endemic countries.

We have faced many challenges in our journey to eradicate polio. But we’ve made remarkable progress, and the polio infrastructure that Rotarians helped build will serve as a lasting legacy that will continue to help protect vulnerable children against other diseases for decades to come.

We are calling on you today to recommit yourselves to ending polio. We need each and every one of you to help finish this fight and continue raising $50 million each year for PolioPlus. The eradication of wild polio in the African region shows us that polio eradication is achievable, and shows how our hard work, partnerships and financial commitment continue to propel us forward, even during a global pandemic.

Thank you for your continued efforts, for achieving a wild polio-free African region, and for remaining committed to fulfilling our promise of a polio-free world.

Sincerely,
Holger Knaack                                                                                         K.R. Ravindran
President, Rotary International                                                           Chair, The Rotary Foundation

Rotary International President Holger Knaack and Nigeria National PolioPlus Chair Dr. Tunji Funsho congratulate Rotarians on eradicating wild polio in the African Region. Watch here.
Links
 

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